Street Focus 41 – Q&A and Street Challenge

Street Focus 41 – Q&A and Street Challenge

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Today my guest co-host is my good friend and photographer Paul Griffiths. Together we answer whether there is a difference between Street and Urban Photography, whether or not we use the in-camera filters and jpeg settings and if a prime lens is preferable to a zoom lens to shoot street. The questions were sent by Edward Ureña, Ken Lyons and Piä Gùptä.

To see more of my guest's work, visit Paul Griffiths' website, his YouTube channel and his latest Life @ 1/15th sec. project.

And the Winners are…

Paul chose an image by Jonathan Higbee

©Jonathan Higbee
©Jonathan Higbee

Valerie chose an image by James Hyatt

©James Hyatt
©James Hyatt

Both winners received an ebook of their choice from our good friends at Rocky Nook!

Picks of the week:

Paul's pick: The Photographer's Playbook

Valerie's Pick: Hit the Streets with Valerie Jardin tip videos on YouTube

Next Street Challenge: Break the Rules to create tension. Enter 1 photograph per person in the comment section below by July 23!

Break the rules! Create tension by going against the natural visual flow, etc. The key is to do it with intent.

Samples by Valerie below:

 

43 Comments

    1. This is the winner. While many ofher attempts to break rules look a bit forced, this one is so natural. (If mine, I’d photoshop away small shadow of the monument toward right of it, maybe crop it in panoramic fashion at abouth step width from the head of the monument on top and about step width from the bottom step of the monument on the bottom).

    2. Thank you for you kind feedback dusanmal. I did try to crop this as pano, this was the one I could live with 🙂

  1. Centered subject clown, cutting off head and legs near edge to create tension.
    Sydney, Australia.

  2. Spotted this lovely young lady descending the escalator at the Garage G AirTrain Station at SFO.

  3. This was a fun challenge, I think this one breaks rules if cropping, one figure is severely cropped and the other is up against the opposite edge, I think the lines hold it together.

  4. Thank you ever so much Valerie for selecting my photo. I am very honoured and you are right it was a great feeling to have captured that moment. I do agree with you about the edit. In the original shot it was a bit dark (due to the overcast conditions) and the subject didn’t quite stand out. In trying to rectify this I over cooked it.

  5. Crossing the street.

    This was captured on Victoria Street, London and when this person crossed the street it was the perfect opportunity to break the photography rules and position him centre stage.

  6. Capture in Montreal, it looked like the music director was sending the man away.

  7. Head-cropping on main subject, one foot/leg behind a bag, a lot of different textures and lines: I can feel a lot of tension looking at this picture 🙂

  8. Girl in the window. I broke the rules by focusing on the shisha pipes at the back of the cafe behind her rather than her face.

  9. Taken this past weekend during a camping trip in Dodgeville, Wisconsin. Breaking the rules of thirds by placing subject dead center…

  10. This image breaks the rules by having the subjects of interest on the far right and left of the image, and by having a dark pole splitting the image in the middle.

  11. took this while at the museum, in Dallas, centered my main subject but also cought another leaving the frame

    1. Valerie, I am humbled by the selection of my image as one of the two winners. While listening to Street Focus #45, Ugo shared why he liked and selected my image, and I was glad that you both found the image humorous. That was the intent. The man is actually riding a bicycle on a bike path that is hidden by the hedge row. I submitted this for this “Create tension by going against the natural visual flow”, because although humorous, some viewers might feel some tension by not knowing what is happening. Is this man a streaker or doing something else in the nude? I don’t know if there is a “rule” that I broke other than purposely not telling (showing) the whole story. Anyway, I’m glad Ugo and you liked it.

  12. I think this image creates tension due to having empty space in the middle with the subjects being placed on both sides of the frame. When you realise what is happening the eye is drawn across the frame and back again, maybe back again but always over the empty tables where it feels as though something should be there to hold the eye.

  13. The guy on the left just sat down to munch his burrito when I noticed he was framed in the window reflection from across the street along with the street light growing out of his head.