This Week in Photo

TWiP 487: Amputees en Vogue

TWiP 487: Amputees en Vogue

On this week’s show: Sony’s new 4K Action Cam adds optical image stabilization. Paralympic athletes replaced with able-bodied models in Vogue campaign. Plus a tourist is jailed for flying his drone in Havana.

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4 thoughts on “TWiP 487: Amputees en Vogue”

  1. Perspective and compression are a function of camera to subject distance, not focal length. Although depth of field would not be the same for the same aperture, your 42.5mm on a micro four thirds camera will produce the same compression as an 85mm on a full frame camera, if the subject to camera distance is the same. Enjoy your 42.5mm Frederick!

  2. Gustavo, you’re absolutely correct. I don’t know where my mind was on this one! I, like many photographers, was misinformed and only learned the correct reasoning around a year or two ago but my mind keeps reverting to old knowledge. I even did some tests to prove it to myself when I was faced with the new knowledge!

    One thing that focal length WILL affect, as you mention, is depth of field; the lens design itself will also have an impact on bokeh. Both important attributes for a portrait lens. All reports seem to state that this 42.5mm lens is awesome. 🙂

    Thanks very much for posting the correction!

  3. I understand exactly what you are saying! This is one of those photography concepts that are sort of counter intuitive and you keep forgetting them. I guess that is one of the reasons why photography is so interesting!

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