TWiP Episode 457 – Chasing Color

For photographers, accurate color has always been somewhat subjective and elusive. Everyone perceives colors differently due to variances in biology, environment and even time of day. Apple, in their relentless quest to make our lives better through technology have introduced a new feature in their upcoming iPads that effectively changes the display you’re viewing based on the current surroundings. That sounds fantastic on the surface, but for artists looking to create works that are somewhat consistent in color rendition, it might prove to exacerbate an already tough problem.

Before we get started, we also wanted to let you know that Frederick is excited to be speaking at the Out of Chicago conference June 24­-26. For a limited time, they’re knocking $100 off the registration price if you use the code “twipchicago” when you sign up. Just head over to TWiP.Pro/OOC to see all the details. See you in the windy city!

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Out of Chicago

Frederick is excited to be speaking at the Out of Chicago conference June 24­-26. For a limited time, they’re knocking $100 off the registration price if you use the code “twipchicago” when you sign up. Just head over to TWiP.Pro/OOC to see all the details. See you in the windy city!


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  • Otto van den Toorn

    Just listened to you excellent podcast. One thing i know about the quality of light from a flash concerns. There is a difference. The flashtube contains a mix of gasses. The balance of the difgerent gasses and the quicker it converts the energy from the electronics into photons makes a real difference. In colors (skintones etc) and the freesing of action. Greetings from holland. Otto

    • Thank you Otto, Glad you enjoyed the podcast. Regards, Shiv

    • See, now it gets even deeper! Another variable would be what is the exact MIX or formula of those flashcube gasses.

  • Nakean Wickliff

    THanks guys! Love the podcast! I wanted to comment about the Apple color correction. My thoughts are that 99 percent of the popluation DOES NOT have calibrated monitors. They come from the factory with a slightly different hue and ridiculous brightness settings. Those of us that do have calibrated monitors will make sure to turn this feature off if need be. For the other 99 percent of people/clients we show our work to, they will FINALLY be able to see it the way we intended. Or maybe I’m all wrong……

    • Interesting Nakean. And that’s so true. So then, I wonder if it’s an exercise in futility to even attempt to calibrate! Considering that likely NO one will ever see the image as you intended, it’s probably better to just target a WIDE RANGE, and hope for the best. 🙁

      • Nakean Wickliff

        Haha! It does seem futile, doesn’t it? I’ve thought the same for video grading too, as most will be looking on an extremely bright monitor or television. But at least you have piece of mind knowing that if it were to ever reach print or someone that does have a calibrated display it will look as you intended. To everyone else, eh..you tried! You can’t guess what their equipment will be set to but at least we all have a standard to base our pro work upon. Seriously, keep up the great work! I’m super excited each week when the show comes out. It’s great while I’m editing my clients’ photos, even helps calm my nerves when driving to my next big gig!

      • lvthunder

        You should calibrate so your images look the way you want them on people’s screens or prints who care about color. If someones screen is off then everyone’s images on that screen are off and the person who uses it all the time has taught themselves to adjust it out.

  • lvthunder

    You guys are mixing two technologies together. The screen in the little iPad Pro changes based on the lighting you are in just like an analog print would. Your eyes naturally color correct it so white stays white. The other Apple calls night shift and does what thay fl.ux program does. As it gets darker the screen warms up just like a sunset. Some people are beginning to think that starring at light that has too much blue in it tricks your body into thinking it’s still daytime and not time to sleep. So if you are in a dark room again your eyes will adjust it and you shouldn’t notice the difference.

    • Marksetgo

      This iOS feature has a toggle switch. Therefore user can turn true-tone on (or off) at will, crisis averted 🙂

  • Thank you for sharing this post.