Images From Electrons – ITL 02

Our desire to see more and more detail on a microscopic scale eventually hits limitations of light itself. Where photons fail, electrons take over and allow us to create images of unbelievably small things. Cells and viruses, even small clusters of atoms, electron microscopes reveal tiny universes for scientific value. Many of these images can be beautiful, and we talk with Ted Kinsman about how they work, why they’re needed, and how you work with such extreme imaging equipment. Ted Kinsman uses electron microscopes to create images for education, but builds beauty into his work to captivate viewers. Get ready for a very geeky conversation!

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In his TWiP podcast, Don Komarechka dives into photographic science and intrigue in ways that will fuel any geek discussion. Technology, colour science, human perception and how photography can push beyond these limits are commonplace of the discussions found here.

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  • Whew… I’m on geek-out overdose! Mr. Kinsman is here in my hometown of Rochester so I’m afraid I’ll run into him and have to say something intelligent about this podcast and I’ll come up empty. We can always talk about the weather since it snowed a foot or so yesterday.

  • Jeffry De Meyer

    Would it be possible to target=”_blank” the urls, I was listening and some images were discussed so I clicked on the link to sciencephotography only to have it open in this tab and stop the playback.

    adding target=”_blank” in the link will open the links in a new tab and prevent the podcast from being disrupted

  • Hagen Trondheim

    Wow, what amazing last two shows. Thank you!
    It is so full of content that it could easily fill many shows.
    I had to listen to the colour episode twice.
    I wish you could do extra shows on dynamic range+hdr, faveon vs bayer, latest lens tecnology and coatings, m43 vs FF vs MF, Macro-lens vs rings vs zoom lenses with macro function.
    Please continue the great Work,
    Hagen from Trondheim, Norway