TWiP Episode 456 – Please Shoot Responsibly

We’ve been reporting on the tendency of authorities to knee­jerk infringe on photographers’ rights over the past several years, but sometimes there are those photographers that shoot irresponsibly and make it harder for the rest of us. In this episode we take a look at two such cases. One involving torching a beloved shipwreck off the coast of California, in the name of “getting the shot”.

Also, Flickr continues to evolve, this time the photo giant is making its “Auto­Uploader” feature available only to pro (or paid) users. And finally, we discuss the implications of the on­going Apple v The Feds argument around cell phone security and privacy. The implications, in either direction, are eye­opening.

Before we get started, we also wanted to let you know that Frederick is excited to be speaking at the Out of Chicago conference June 24­-26. For a limited time, they’re knocking $100 off the registration price if you use the code “twipchicago” when you sign up. Just head over to TWiP.Pro/OOC to see all the details. See you in the windy city!

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Out of Chicago

Frederick is excited to be speaking at the Out of Chicago conference June 24­-26. For a limited time, they’re knocking $100 off the registration price if you use the code “twipchicago” when you sign up. Just head over to TWiP.Pro/OOC to see all the details. See you in the windy city!


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  • steven_nc

    And we wonder why permits are being required more and more.

  • chrispayant

    I am glad Derrick mentioned train tracks. Most people do not know that it is illegal to photograph on train tracks and I continue to see photos of children on the tracks. It is so dangerous and irresponsible. Thanks for raising these issues and for such a great episode. Great episode. Thanks!

  • chrispayant

    I am glad Derrick mentioned train tracks. Most people do not know that it is illegal to photograph on train tracks and I continue to see photos of children on the tracks. It is so dangerous and irresponsible. Thanks for raising these issues and for such a great episode!

  • dusanmal

    There was an oxymoron in this show… Important to underline in these days of the battle for our basic rights in the new-tech era because it shows how little average host knows and/or understands. Two statements, one that we should do everything to protect our Constitutional rights in this era, another-to make it legal for judge to make a warrant for a person to unlock his/her phone…
    5th amendment, right to not-self-incriminate. Not a theory, not an interpretation but direct Constitutional protection of what is in our minds. Held every which way. In old times, Government could get a search warrant for your home and find papers you may have written in code only you know. 5th amendment, than and now protects you from being prosecuted to give Government that code you know. They are free to try and crack it as much as they will, you are free from helping them. You can’t be prosecuted, forced, punished in any way for that.
    Same trivially applies to your technology-phone, computer,… It has even been tested in the Court in recent years and Supreme Court confirmed – if password is something you know you absolutely, definitely do not need to give it to the Government and it can’t punish you for that in any way shape or form nor assume anything from your denial.
    So, Government by our Constitutional rights have every right to issue warrant for your phone, computer,… and they’ll get it. They have absolutely no right to compel information about it from your own mind. Otherwise we are on a quick road to Orwell or East Germany, pick your poison.
    If your data is with someone else who also has a key (ex. Apple and their cloud storage), Government can ask them and get that data with warrant (and in the most recent case, Apple complied to that).
    Where we are now is the question “Can Government ban any encryption they can’t break?”. Answer is very trivial as well, encryption is Math, well known, documented and published Math. Even if law is made, it can’t outlaw Math nor change it. Level of computing skill to implement it is low. Cat is out of the bag.

  • Marksetgo

    Ep 455 and 456 not showing in iTunes (at least not for me). If the problem is widespread, can’t be good for your numbers, and therefore advertisers, so thought I’d mention it in case it’s not just an issue at my end?